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The second annual Secret Marathon to be held March 6

Held during the week of International Women's Day, the series honours our right to be free to run

Tomorrow, on the eve of International Women’s Day, in 16 locations across the country as well as a virtual location, the second annual Secret Marathon 3K run will be held.

The marathon has its roots in the documentary film of the same name, which looks at the running of Afghanistan’s only marathon. The route of the Marathon of Afghanistan had to be kept secret to ensure the safety of its female participants.

Toronto filmmaker Kate McKenzie travelled to the country in secret to work on the documentary alongside legendary marathon runner Martin Parnell.

“It has been my life’s work to share stories from places where we usually only hear the negative. These stories have the power to show that there is hope and that it is realistic that there could one day be peace,” says McKenzie. “When Martin told me he was planning to go to Afghanistan and invited me to join I knew it was an amazing opportunity to share a story that matters.”

When McKenzie returned home after filming, she had the urge to create an event to honour that story and celebrate the rights of all of us to have the freedom to run. When she met the Running Room’s John Stanton at a race in Ottawa, the two collaborated on the Secret Marathon event series. The event also has a program for schools.

"The goal of The Secret Marathon 3K is to celebrate our right to be free to run and walk in our community. Many women both here in Canada and in Afghanistan don't feel safe to run at night or alone and we want to change that by bringing our community together to celebrate everyone's right to be free to run or walk in their community," says McKenzie, the National Race Director of the event. It’s an inspiring story about community and empowerment. And it’s pretty perfect for this week.

The event is a 1.5km out and back race, and just like in the Marathon of Afghanistan the route is revealed at the beginning of the event.

Locations for The Secret Marathon 3K: Victoria, Vancouver, Kelowna, Calgary, Red Deer, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Peterborough, Barrie, Waterloo, Kingston, Toronto, Ottawa, Fredericton, Halifax, St.John’s.

For information on a race location near you, go to the Running Room.
 

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Treating Concussions with Physiotherapy

According to Statistics Canada approximately 30,000 hockey players a year suffer a concussion

It’s everywhere.  The talk about concussion. Everyone seems to know someone that has had one or is currently sitting on the sidelines because of one.  

According to Statistics Canada approximately 30,000 hockey players a year suffer a concussion.  Seventy eight percent of all concussions occur during sport. 

What is a concussion? A concussion is a traumatic brain injury that alters the way your brain functions. It is a shear stress to the brain tissue caused by rotational or angular forces, direct impact is not required. Some injuries to the brain can cause a loss of consciousness, but most concussions do not. Because of this, some people have concussions and don't realize it. Most symptoms resolve within 7-10 days, however, approximately 30% of the time symptoms persist. Effects are usually temporary but can include headaches and problems with concentration, memory, balance and coordination. There are 22 signs and symptoms that can result from concussions, most of us are only aware on average of about 5 or 6.  

Concussions are common, particularly if you play a contact sport, such as football, rugby, soccer. But every concussion injures your brain to some extent. The brain needs time to rest and heal properly. Most concussive traumatic brain injuries are mild (mTBI), and people usually recover fully.  

If you are involved in a contact sport it is important to get a baseline test done. Baseline concussion tests give health care professionals a starting point should you sustain a concussion during your season. Baseline tests are used to assess an athlete’s balance and brain function (including learning and memory skills, ability to pay attention or concentrate, and how quickly he or she thinks and solve problems), as well as for the presence of any concussion symptoms. Results from baseline tests (or pre-injury tests) can be used and compared to a similar exam conducted by a health care professional during the season if an athlete has a suspected concussion.

Baseline tests consist of a series of clinically validated musculoskeletal, vestibular, balance, proprioceptive and cognitive protocols including; SCAT3, ImPACT and BESS standardized tests. These tests give us valuable objective data so that in the event of a concussion, we know what normal was for the athlete and this helps us in making informed decisions about an individualized treatment path and when to determine the athlete is ready to return to school or sport. 

 

Think of your brain as you would another body part that you may injure, knee, back, shoulder. Each body part injured needs treatment. The brain needs to be rehabilitated too. Studies show that within an 8 week vestibular and cervical spine rehabilitation program, athletes with symptoms of headache, dizziness and neck pain have a 66% higher rate of return to sport/school (Orthopaedic Division Review-Vol.27 No.2). Certified Athletic Therapists and Physiotherapists are trained to take the patient through a series of validated treatment protocols depending on the flagged areas after a concussion. We look at all the systems that the brain controls and what it is affected by; the neck (cervicogenic), the vestibular system, balance, memory and the oculormotor system (eyes). We are able to focus our treatment on the specific area that is causing your symptoms. For example if we flag an area through your baseline test redone, and through our series of assessment processes with your eyes, we essentially take your eyes to the gym and strengthen them back up. Until all the systems are functioning properly together will you be able to return to your daily life, work, school and play at 100%. 

Here are a few excellent resources online for more detailed concussion information.

https://sjhc.london.on.ca/concussion-mtbi

http://links.lww.com/JHTR/A131

http://dvbic.dcoe.mil/resources/progressive-return-to-activity

 

Kara Creed is a Certified Athletic Therapist and Nancy Botting is a Sport Physiotherapist. Both are from Physical Edge Physiotherapy - a multidisciplinary sort medicine clinic in Oakville , Ontario. www.physicaledgephysio.com